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Colleen Gular


Colleen Gular
423 North Main Street | Doylestown, PA 18901
Phone: 215-348-7100 | Office Phone: 215-348-7100 | Toll Free: 800-360-7100 | Fax: 267-354-6836
Cell: 267-266-2084 | email: cgular@remax.net

My Blog

Appliance Safety in the Home: How to Prevent Tip-overs

December 13, 2013 4:27 am

In light of recent tragedies nationwide involving tipped over appliances, The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recently completed a review of various tip-over hazards that can occur in the home.

Families must be aware of leaving children unattended in the kitchen, even if the stove is turned off. Many accidents occur when children attempt to climb on top of a stove door causing the appliance to topple over. With senior citizens, the same can happen when they are leaning on it for support. If the stove is on at the time of the incident, the heat will only make injuries worse and risk of death greater.

The CPSC recommends the following to prevent related tragedies in the future:

-Manufacturers should create better stability in their designs. Models should be able to support 100 pounds on an open oven door. Although this may require some major redesigns, the added safety bonus will benefit everyone.
-Manufacturers should design door hinges that lock in the open position, should an oven start to tip forward.
-Install anti-tip devices that prevent an appliance from working unless they are properly installed.
-Appliances should be programmed to automatically shut off the heat should they begin to tip.

Consumers should be aware that these types of incidents can occur in their home. To prevent this from happening to you or your loved ones, be sure to secure your stove with tip restraints provided by your manufacturer. New appliances made after 1991 should have shipped with them included, but may or may not be pre-installed. The CPSC reports that it is not aware of a single injury or death cause by an appliance with tip restraints properly installed.

For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Three Questions to Ask Yourself before Adding a Pet to the Family

December 12, 2013 4:24 am

Whether it's a dog, cat, hamster, bird or other critter, a new pet is always an exciting addition, especially around the holidays when many families choose to bring a new pet into their home.

However, December is often a busy month when people do not have the time or energy to focus on a new pet. Before making this big decision, ask yourself some simple questions.

How much time each day can be committed to the pet? Work schedules, school schedules and other factors greatly affect how long people are home during the day. Some pets require more personal attention than others. For instance, larger, more energetic dog breeds, such as Boxers, will need to be walked at least two times a day.

For those who can't make that time commitment, small dogs or cats may require less exercise time, but still need quite a bit of one-on-one attention and toys to keep them mentally stimulated if the pet parent is gone during the day. Small animals like hamsters, guinea pigs and reptiles may be better suited for those who plan on being gone all day long.

Typically, these pets will be safe in their habitat during the day, provided the pet parent gives them all the requirements necessary to keep them happy and healthy. However, it is still important to nurture a connection with these pets, as many of them love to be held and handled. For those considering a puppy, it's important to consider the time commitment to properly potty train the dog.

What is affordable? Some pets cost more than others. In addition to upfront adoption fees, there are a number of factors that determine the cost of a pet. Large dogs will need more food, certain breeds require professional grooming services more often, young dogs and cats may require special training courses and reptiles can require specialized habitats and heat lamps.

Before deciding on a pet, be sure to research all costs associated with that pet, including costs that could come later in the animal’s life, rather than just immediately. For example, pet parents may not know that it is important to invest in their pet's oral health, which can help avoid costly dental surgeries down the line.

What does the family want to get out of the pet? Being a pet parent is a benefit to both the human and the animal and many pet parents say that their animal does more for them than they ever expected. It's important to ask what the family wants to get by adding a new pet to the family.

Perhaps it's having a cuddle buddy; maybe it's teaching kids responsibility, it could be the thought of having a pet help encourage someone to get physically fit, or perhaps it's having an independent animal who can cheer others up. Whatever it is, consider this feedback before getting a new pet. For those who decide a new puppy is best for their wants and needs, make sure the dog is well socialized before taking them out and about.

Sometimes waiting until after the holidays to add a new pet to the house may be the best option. Getting kids a habitat to unwrap during the celebrations and letting them choose their own pet after the holidays can turn one special day into two.

Source: http://www.petco.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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7 Tips for Winter Storm Safety

December 12, 2013 4:24 am

As Old Man Winter approaches, millions across the nation are threatened with heavy snow, ice storms and power outages. To help homeowners prepare for the iciness ahead, Kohler Generators shares expert tips for storm safety.

1. Assemble a dedicated storm box or bucket. Having items on hand like batteries, candles, matches, flashlights, AM radio, water and even extra cash can be useful if your area loses power. If told by officials to evacuate your home, leave well in advance. Make plans for a safe route and destination where someone will be expecting you at a predetermined day and time.

2. Create a storm to-do list. This list reminds you of the important things you need to do before the storm hits. Things like getting prescription drugs, filling propane tanks, going to the bank and filling your car with gas can be essential.

3. Compile a list of important phone numbers. Essential phone numbers to have on hand can include: utility companies, insurance company, bank, doctors, radio stations and local police. Also, have at least one hard-wired landline phone in the house.

4. Protect your chilled and frozen food supply. Before the storm hits, pack your most commonly consumed items like milk, cold cuts and leftovers in a cooler with ice. Turn your refrigerator/freezer settings to the highest levels to chill remaining food as much as possible. Keep your refrigerator door taped closed to prevent unnecessary opening during a power outage.

5. Store water if you are on a well system. Store plenty of drinking water in clean containers. Also, store water in your bathtub so you can flush the toilet with a bucket of water when needed.

6. Inspect your basement sump pump system before the storm. During a major storm, heavy rains can flood your basement, so make sure your sump pump is plugged in and fully operational. Inspect the pump switch float ball on your sump pump to make sure it is operating smoothly. Also, make sure the drain line is not blocked and extends at least four feet away from your home's foundation. Finally, get a battery backup for your sump pump in case of power loss.

7. Look into an automatic standby generator system. A standby generator is permanently installed outside your home and hooks up to existing gas lines (propane or natural gas). If power is lost, a standby generator will automatically start up and restore power to your home. It can power lights, heating/cooling systems, refrigerators, sump pumps, home security systems, computers and more. With the addition of a standby generator, most issues you face during a storm can be eliminated.

Source: Kohler Generators

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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50 Percent Increase in Homeowners Using Smartphones for Home Remodeling

December 12, 2013 4:24 am

Planese, Inc. released its latest survey of U.S. homeowners about their use of technology to help plan and complete their home remodeling projects. In the survey, homeowners were asked about their past use of smartphones and PCs for remodeling and their planned usage for future projects. More than one out of four (27 percent) reported using their smartphones in the past for a variety of tasks to help with remodeling their homes. The percentage jumped to 40 percent when they were asked if they planned to use smartphones for future remodeling projects.

"This dramatic increase in smartphone use to help with remodeling is driven by a variety of changes: greater use of mobile devices, a need for homeowners to get better results from their remodeling investments and better apps," says Dan Fritschen, founder of www.remodelormove.com, author and homeowner advocate. "Mobile devices are a great compliment to the PC. Smartphones enable regular and frequent communications that are critical to improving collaboration between homeowners and contractors."

Detailed findings from the Planese survey show that for future remodeling projects, respondents plan to:

Find remodeling design ideas
• Use a smartphone (65 percent)
• Use a PC (95 percent)

Get remodeling cost estimates
• Use a smartphone (27 percent)
• Use a PC (66 percent)

Search for a remodeling contractor
• Use a smartphone (56 percent)
• Use a PC (80 percent)

Research products/services
• Use a smartphone (67 percent)
• Use a PC (67 percent)

Do background checks
• Use a smartphone (25 percent)
• Use a PC (50 percent)

Fritschen also noted their studies have found better communication and more collaboration is key to improving the low level of customer satisfaction in the home remodeling industry. "While constant communication in everyday life may be too much for some people, a constant flow of communication is one of the four elements that ensures a successful remodeling project."

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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3 New Year's Resolutions That Will Enrich Your Retirement

December 11, 2013 4:24 am

For many baby boomers looking to retire in the next few years, the biggest worry is not whether or not they can retire, but if they’ll outlive their savings. It’s a valid concern: One of every four people turning 65 today can expect to live past their 90th birthday, and one in 10 will live past 95, according to the Social Security Administration.

For a married couple, there's a 58 percent chance that one of them will live to 90.

With 10,000 boomers turning 65 every day, it’s something on the minds of more than a fourth of Americans.

“I went into this business because I hated seeing people who’d followed the rules – saved money in a 401k, put their kids through college, gave to charity – get to retirement and find they didn’t have enough to sustain them for more than a few years,” says Andrew McNair, founder and CEO of SWAN Capital, and author of “Don’t be Penny Wise & Dollar Foolish.”

“It’s not enough to have a certain amount of money in your portfolio; you want to have a guaranteed check coming in in addition to your investments.”

Whether you’re years from retirement or planning for it now, McNair says these three New Year’s resolutions will be the best you ever made:

• Resolve to plan for expenses in retirement to equal or exceed your expenses today. Many people assume their expenses will decline once they retire – they forget that they’re going to have a lot more free time to do what they love, McNair says. “What are your dreams? Will you want to travel? Take up a new hobby? Meet friends for golf two or three times a week? Those likely are going to be expenses you don’t have now,” he says. Also, once you retire, things don’t magically last forever. The rug in the dining room, the fridge in the kitchen – eventually they’ll need to be replaced or repaired. Also, as you age, medical expenses either appear or increase. Sit down and think about what your ideal retirement looks like, and presume that it will be for at least 30 years. Make a list and take a guess at what those activities cost – even if your retirement is years away. How much money will you need coming in each month or year?

• Resolve to get most of your investments out of tax-deferred plans. If you’re working for a company that provides a match for 401k contributions, by all means, contribute up to the maximum match. “That’s free money – you’d be crazy not to take advantage,” McNair says. But anything beyond that should be invested in something that’s more tax efficient: Roth IRA, municipal bonds, life insurance or real estate. No one expects taxes will go down – they’ll be going up. Uncle Sam already has a lien on your IRA or 401(k); don’t let his lien, the taxes you’ll owe, continue to grow. Go ahead and pay now, and your future retired self will be glad you did.

• Resolve to have a portfolio that generates a steady or guaranteed paycheck. The ideal financial security for retirement is having a guaranteed income that increases with inflation, McNair says. “You want to plan for an income that meets or exceeds your annual income now so, if you’ll be getting $1,000 a month from Social Security at age 62 and your current income is $4,000 a month, you need to have a plan to guarantee $3,000 a month to cover that gap.” Annuities and life insurance are the only investments that provide a guaranteed income you cannot outlive, so consider them for at least part of your portfolio. “You don’t want them to make up 100 percent of your portfolio, but they should provide the foundation,” McNair says.

It’s important to start thinking now about where you want to be in retirement and what combination of investments will ensure you have the lifestyle you want for as long as you live, he says.

“At 65, you don’t want to be making risky investments because you’re panicking about not having enough money.”

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Control the Clutter with Drop Zones

December 11, 2013 4:24 am

(Family Features) After returning home from a long day at work, a weekend soccer tournament or an all-day shopping excursion, it’s natural to want to drop everything and relax. However, literally dropping everything can cause a tremendous amount of clutter in the home, leading to stress, misplaced items and wasted time. To eliminate the clutter that busy lifestyles create, try establishing designated drop zones throughout your house to regain a sense of order. Don’t worry, you can still drop everything and relax when you come home – just drop everything in the right spot.

Entryway
As the first and last access point of your home, a lot of activity occurs here. Coats, scarves, hats and bags are dropped everywhere, while dirty shoes are kicked off and left behind. Basically, the entrance to your home can become a minefield.  To control unruly entryway clutter, try creating a drop zone near the door.  The addition of a coat rack or hooks make it easy to hang up outerwear, while a storage bench is a convenient place to take off shoes and neatly stow them away.   

Kitchen
Since the kitchen is the heart of the home, many family members congregate here. Establish a corner of the kitchen counter to drop lunch boxes, bottles and coffee mugs used throughout the day. To prevent a pile-up of papers and misplaced items, set up a command center with enough space to file mail and bills and store your keys and other small essentials.

Living Room
Don’t let relaxation be delayed because of disorganization. Depending on the size of your living room and how you use the space, you may need to establish several drop zones. For example, a coffee table tray or basket is ideal for storing remotes and chargers. Add storage cubes with bins as a convenient place to store and hide laptop cords, tablets, gaming equipment and children’s toys. Consider labeling a bin for each family member to “drop” or stow their stuff.

Bedroom
To clear clothing clutter, use a valet rod to hang up tomorrow’s outfit or clothes that need to be taken to the tailor or dry cleaner. Additionally, try designating a dresser drawer as a drop zone for jewelry, watches, your wallet or other valuables.

Make it a habit to use your strategically placed drop zones and your house will be organized and clutter free in no time.

Source: Closet Maid

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Unique Traditions and Festivals Bring America's Holiday Season to Life

December 11, 2013 4:24 am

From evergreen trees to palms, homeowners across the country trim their trees and deck the halls for the winter holidays. Homes.com sought out the top 10 exciting cities with the most notable winter flair and has announced its Top 10 Winter Wonderlands. Homes.com is showcasing the towns best known for their yuletide observances and winter festivities. From the fierce winter winds nicknamed “The Hawk” in Chicago, Ill., to the hot natural pools of Lava Springs, Idaho, America’s seasonal spirit spans coast to coast with distinct holiday style in each corner.

Each city in the Homes.com list of Top 10 Winter Wonderlands has its own unique traditions, making each winter experience an unforgettable one for locals and visitors alike. Check out the list of Top 10 Winter Wonderlands that have America buckling up their snow boots for a jolly ride this season. 

1. Atlanta, Ga.

Atlanta sparkles with traditional and thrilling holiday events, filling the air with anticipation and excitement for the season. Residents and visitors can enjoy the magical lighting of Macy’s Great Tree at Lenox Square or take a ride on the store’s “Pink Pig” train. The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra delights with a series of holiday concerts, and the annual Children’s Christmas Parade makes its way through downtown Atlanta on famed Peachtree Street. Tour festive homes, especially one at Peachtree & Dunwoody that takes an over-the-top approach to lawn décor with more than 50 inflatables, including a giant spinning dreidel.

2. Saranac Lake, N.Y.

When you live in the woodsy timberlands of New York’s Adirondacks, you don’t have to venture far to be inspired by the season’s magic and allure. Besides the abundant natural beauty, this former logging town just up the road from Lake Placid plays host to an annual winter carnival dating back to 1897. Crowning the town is the massive Ice Palace, made from ice bricks cut from local Lake Flower and lighted at night. This beautiful icy facade sets the scene for a snowy paradise, picture-perfect for winter enthusiasts.

3. Chicago, Ill.

Even with temperatures dropping well below freezing, Chicagoans know how to shake off the winter blues. From gift shopping on swanky Michigan Avenue to checking out the twinkling lights of Lincoln Park Zoo, there’s something for everyone. Experience a German holiday celebration at the Christkindlmarket by enjoying authentic German foods, shopping and entertainment. The holiday spirit abounds as residents enjoy bundling up and taking in everything that makes living in the Windy City so fantastic.

4. Lava Hot Springs, Idaho

If living near hot springs and only two hours north of Salt Lake City’s ski slopes is not thrilling enough…Lava Springs offers a jaw-dropping winter tradition. Each year, locals run the snowy streets stripped down to bikinis and boots during the annual Fire & Ice Festival on Main Street. The race ends at the Idaho State Hot Springs, which stay toasty year-round at 112 degrees.

5. Boston, Mass.

With more than 58 colleges in the area, this city is renowned for its plethora of higher education options. Bostonians can take advantage of their proximity to these college campuses and enjoy many university choral concerts and holiday showcases throughout the season. Residents can also hop on down to Frog Pond in Boston Commons, the nation’s oldest public park, to ice skate or pick up a sled and ride down the snowy banks.

6. Nashville, Tenn.

The holiday season in cultured Nashville is filled with lots of carol crooning and jingle bell rockin’. The city’s southern belle homes of yesteryear get decked out in grandiose style. These wonderful old homes are decorated with authentic holiday antiques and showcase everything from trees trimmed antebellum style to historic holiday dress. To see some modern-day homes really put on a show, take a joy ride down Sunnyside Drive in the Brentwood community, known for its opulent light displays. As part of this annual tradition, the neighborhood collects donations from holiday lights spectators to raise money for local charities.

7. Baltimore, Md.

For 66 years in Baltimore’s Hampden section, the neighborhood light display has been a holiday spectacle that now garners national recognition. Every year, residents of 34th Street adorn their homes with lights in every nook and cranny for a sensational display. This fantastic showcase coincidentally shares its name with the iconic New York City street in the holiday film, Miracle on 34th Street. The out-of-this-world exhibition in one of the best cities to celebrate this holiday season has become so big that many residents argue it can be seen from space.

8. Grapevine, Texas

Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the holiday fun. Branded the Christmas Capital of Texas®, Grapevine has a wide range of excitement to offer every member of the family. With more than 1,400 events taking place over a span of 40 days, even Scrooge would get into the holiday spirit in this city. Music lovers can check out performances at the Grapevine Opry, take a break from the traditional celebrations at the indoor water park, or visit the International Christmas Market to purchase unique holiday gifts.   

9. Denver, Co.

There is no need to search high and low for unique inspiration in the Mile High City. Locals head to historic lower downtown Denver, nicknamed LoDo, for holiday fun with artistic flair. Each year, art students compete in the LoDo Aglow Window design contest, decorating store windows for the season. A walking tour of the district gives residents an up-close and personal look at the designs before they are judged by city officials, business owners and art enthusiasts.

10. Park City, Utah

With neighbors including U.S. Ski Team Olympians, Park City residents know how to take advantage of all the fun that comes with cold weather. Park City is a winter sports enthusiast’s heaven, receiving more than 500 inches of powdery snow each winter. Adventure abounds on over 100 slopes and trails. The historic Park City District also hosts a number of events, including a gingerbread house competition and the number one rated winter sports special, the Deer Valley Celebrity Ski Fest. The premiere network celebrity ski weekend takes place each December and draws stars from the Olympic Games, film and television, all participating to raise funds for a good cause.

For more information about America’s Top 10 Winter Wonderlands, visit the Homes.com blog at blog.homes.com.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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12 Tips for a Healthy Holiday

December 10, 2013 4:24 am

The holiday season is a joyous time of year, but it can also be stressful, exhausting and dangerous to your health. All the cooking, cleaning, shopping, decorating and entertaining can impact an individual's physical and emotional well-being and lead to injury or illness.

To maximize the joys of the holidays and minimize the risks of illness and injury, clinical experts from Kessler Institute, a leader in the field of medical rehabilitation, offer the following tips:

Don't Shop 'til You Drop

Holiday shopping can hurt more than your wallet, says Mark Brinn, P.T., director of Kessler's outpatient rehabilitation services. "Lifting and carrying all those packages can easily lead to aches, pains and strains of the shoulder, neck and upper and lower back."

  • Distribute the weight of shopping bags between both hands. Pick up heavier packages by bending your knees and lifting with your legs, not your back.
  • Take advantage of package holding areas, home delivery and other customer services stores may offer … or consider shopping online.
  • Shopping is a "sport," so be sure to stretch before you hit the mall or market, take breaks and stay hydrated.

Find Some Elves to Help

Falls account for 12 percent of seasonal emergency room visits, and 43 percent are related to falls from ladders, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "In the rush to get everything done, people take short-cuts or try to do too much by themselves," says Brinn. "The best advice is to ask for help."

  • Don't move furniture, large boxes or other heavy items by yourself. Enlist family, friends or neighbors to lend a hand.
  • Use a sturdy ladder when reaching for high shelves or the top of the tree and have someone hold it in place.
  • Remove clutter, including toys, pet supplies and throw rugs; tape down wires; and wipe spills and wet floors immediately to help avoid slips, trips and falls.

Indulge in Moderation

Whether entertaining at home or going to holiday parties, it's hard to avoid the many treats and temptations of the season. Jackie Waldron, a registered dietitian at Kessler, says that by planning ahead and following some basic nutritional guidelines, you can maintain a healthier diet and prevent weight gain.

  • Limit salt, sugar and alcohol intake. Consider serving nuts and dried fruit or hummus and pita bread instead of candy, chips and dips. Substitute honey, agave nectar or a little bit of sugar substitute for white sugars. Use citrus or fresh herbs, like thyme or cilantro, or spices to add flavor without adding salt to savory dishes.
  • Watch portion size and eat slowly to avoid overeating. Don't skip meals as you'll likely wind up eating more or grabbing fast foods.
  • Allow yourself a small splurge or two, so you won't feel deprived.

Stay Connected

While the holiday season may be the favorite time of year for many people, others find it emotionally overwhelming. According to Kessler psychologist Monique Tremaine, Ph.D., "Many people put too much pressure on themselves, trying to find the perfect gift or host the perfect party. In addition, the holidays can evoke memories and feelings of loss and loneliness, which can lead to a lack of interest in seasonal activities, mood swings, changes in sleeping and eating habits and depression."

  • Be realistic; no one can do everything. Set reasonable goals and expectations for yourself and others. Enlist the help of family, friends and neighbors.
  • Have a sense of purpose. Plan to spend time with family or friends if possible, or consider volunteering at a shelter, food bank or other community organization.
  • Acknowledge your emotions, talk about them with close family or friends, and seek professional help if these feelings of sadness or depression persist.

One final recommendation from the experts at Kessler Institute: Get some exercise! Whether you take a walk, go to the gym, or even go dancing, exercise is an excellent way to relieve tension, re-energize your spirit and help to burn some of those extra calories from holiday sweets.

Source: Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Cautious Consumers Stalling Housing Momentum

December 10, 2013 4:24 am

Positive momentum in the housing market continues to lose steam as Americans remain cautious about their personal finances and the state of the economy, according to Fannie Mae's November National Housing Survey results. Among those surveyed, nearly two-thirds believe the economy is on the wrong track while the share expecting their personal finances to worsen during the next year has increased during the past few months to 22 percent. Meanwhile, consumers' home price expectations have declined steadily since summer. The share who say prices are going to increase within the next 12 months fell to 45 percent and the average home price change expectation dipped to 2.5 percent from 2.9 percent. In addition, the share of those who expect mortgage rates to climb in the next 12 months has remained at an elevated level since it spiked in June.

"We continue to see caution as the defining feature of Americans' attitudes toward the economy and their personal financial situation. In this environment, the housing recovery is likely to improve, but only at a gradual pace," said Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. "As the economy continues to improve and household balance sheets for most Americans are slow to repair, we continue to see the transition to a full housing recovery as a slow process. Upcoming fiscal policy discussions and labor market developments may also lead to some bumps along the way."

Other survey highlights include:

  • At 2.5 percent, the average 12-month home price change expectation continued to fall, decreasing 0.4 percent from last month.
  • The share of people who say home prices will go up in the next 12 months fell slightly to 45 percent, and those who say home prices will go down decreased to 9 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say mortgage rates will go up in the next 12 months increased by 2 percentage points to 59 percent.
  • Fifty percent of respondents said it would be easy for them to get a home mortgage today, an increase of 4 percentage points from last month.
  • The share of respondents who said they would buy if they were going to move decreased slightly, to 68 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say the economy is on the right track increased to 32 percent but remains low compared to earlier this year.
  • The percentage of respondents who expect their personal financial situation to get worse in the next 12 months held steady at 22 percent.
  • The share of respondents who say their household income is significantly lower than it was 12 months ago increased slightly to 17 percent.
  • At 33 percent, the share of respondents who say their household expenses are significantly higher than they were 12 months ago fell slightly from last month.

Source: Fannie Mae National Housing Survey

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Is Your Retirement at Risk?

December 10, 2013 4:24 am

Around 70 percent of pre-retirees plan to work longer in retirement, while only 37 percent of retirees took this approach to address retirement risks. These findings are one of several retirement planning issues covered in the Society of Actuaries (SOA) new research report, "2013 Risks and Process of Retirement Survey." The report provides insights on how Americans decide to retire and how they manage resources in retirement.

The online survey of retirees and pre-retirees from ages 45 to 80 provides a glimpse into individuals' financial approaches for retirement and it identifies gaps in retirement preparations. The biggest issues of concern for retirees include inflation, paying for health care and the risk of depleting savings. The survey findings include:

  • Thirty-eight percent of pre-retirees expect to retire by ages 65 to 67 and 15 percent of pre-retirees do not expect to retire. Of the surveyed retirees, nearly 30 percent retired under the age of 55 and another 24 percent retired between ages 55 to 59.
  • Forty-one percent of pre-retirees plan to stop working for pay all at once, compared with 78 percent of retirees who stopped working for pay all at once. Another 35 percent of pre-retirees plan to work for pay part-time or periodically.
  • Health problems would be the primary reason for an early retirement, according to 42 percent of the surveyed pre-retirees.
  • One-quarter of both pre-retirees (25 percent) and retirees (27 percent) said disability or no longer being able to cope with the physical demands of the job would lead to an early retirement.
  • Both the surveyed retirees and pre-retirees plan to reduce spending, increase savings and reduce debt to manage retirement risks. More than 90 percent of both pre-retirees and retirees plan to eliminate all of their consumer debt. A majority of pre-retirees (93 percent) plan to save as much money as possible and 88 percent of pre-retirees plan to cut back on spending to manage risks.
  • Both retirees and pre-retirees have a median planning horizon of 10 years. Around 45 percent of pre-retirees think it is very possible to plan for day-to-day expenses, though they are less likely to plan for other issues in retirements.

Only 36 percent of the surveyed pre-retirees have a financial plan, compared with 67 percent of retirees who have a financial plan.

Source: Society of Actuaries

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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